Friday, May 27, 2011

Tap to Talk


App Name/Publisher: Tap to Talk by Assistyx LLC

Description: An application that is a picture-based voice output system that is organized through albums.

Therapy Use: For expressive communication/voice output. It’s ideal for early communicators (those communicating at the single to 2-3 word level).

Example of branching/linking:

1) Make a choice 2) Choose book 3) Is it spot? 4) No...Who is it?
These all include voice output when pressed.

App Benefits/Likes:
• This application allows for web-based programming. Therefore, multiple team members (SLP, parent, teachers, etc.) can program without having the device as long as they can get “on-line” to the Tap To Talk website. The changes can be updated wirelessly, and therefore the device does not need to be manually connected for updates/programming.
•The existing library is adequate, and allows for importing of digital pictures/other images for personalization.
•You are able to record voices vs. using the digitized voice that is provided. This way the client can have a voice that “matches.” (i.e. young boy can have a young boy’s voice)
•Allows for branching/linking of topics to model and assist with more complex language
•Great customer service for troubleshooting
•Affordable option for an AAC device

Cautions:
•Only allows for 8 albums, so can be limiting. However, branching/linking does help offset this limitation
•With many team members able to program, it’s important to have one person (preferably the communication specialist) “in charge” for consistency of programming for the child
•Programming site is not particularly user friendly
•Library of pictures is not extensive and somewhat abstract. However, you can import your own images as previously stated.

App Summary

Skill(s) Targeted
AAC
Expressive & Receptive Language
Social Skills/Pragmatics

Age/Grade Levels Targeted
Toddler
Preschool
Kindergarten
Early Elementary (Grades 1 – 3)

How to Activate
Isolated finger point
Touch and release

Type of Device
Android
iPhone, iPod Touch, iPad
Nintendo
B&N Color Nook
Web

Cost
$99.95/ yearly subscription

Would you recommend this app?
Yes

Hyperlink
www.taptotalk.com

Reviewed by:
Meghan G. Graham M.S. CCC-SLP
Children’s Therapy Associates (www.childrenstherapyassociates.com)
Twitter: @SLPMeg
www.all4mychild.com (coming May/June 2011)

Review Date: May 26, 2011

Friday, May 20, 2011

iWrite Words

App Name/Publisher: iWriteWords

Description: A beginning writing program that actually teaches proper letter and number formation through the use of adorable graphics. Pleasant sounds and an appealing voice accompany the actions. A crab icon identifies where the child’s finger should be placed to start each letter and connect-the-dots numbers show how to form the letters. Once the letter is drawn, a small box with the letter falls and bounces to the bottom of the screen. Drag it or turn the iPad to move the letter box to the bottom right corner to drop it in a hole. When writing words, a cute drawing of an animal appears while a voice reads the word.



Therapy Use: This app is unique in that it will only allow the child to complete the letter, number, or word if it is executed in the correct manner. Too many writing programs are concerned only with output. The focuse is placed on the process of writing which helps develop foundational motor plans necessary for functional writing.


App Benefits/Likes: Options include upper and lower case letters, numbers, and upper and lower case words. The size of each letter or digit can be adjusted as the child gains proficiency. When letters or numbers are not drawn correctly, the image shakes accompanied by a squeaky toy sound. This draws the child’s attention back to the starting crab to try again in a gentle way.

Cautions: The letters are presented only in alphabetical order with no option to focus on letters of choice. Numbers also are presented in consecutive order and you will find a limited set of words.

App Summary

Skill(s) Targeted
Finger isolation
Fine motor planning
Ocular motor
Fine Motor control
Visual organization
Visual motor
Letter formation
Pacing (slowing down to increase accuracy)

Age/Grade Levels Targeted
Toddler
Preschool
Kindergarten
Early Elementary (Grades 1 – 3)

How to Activate
Isolated finger point
Hold and drag

Type of Device
iPhone, iPod Touch, iPad

Cost
$2.99

Would you recommend this app?
Yes

Reviewed by
Jill Perry, MHA, MS, OTR/L
Children’s Therapy Associates, LLP
all4mychild (coming soon)

Review Date
May 9, 2011

A Day in the Life of an OT with an iPad

Editor's note: Beth Lloyd, an OT from Watertown MA, generously agreed to allow us to cross-post her post from her terrific blog, Thriving in School. It is a great overview about how apps have transformed the school day for her as a therapist.

I bought myself an iPad last summer and work has not been the same. To explain this best, I thought I would give you "snip-its" of my day today with one in hand.

As I walk into school, my briefcase is much lighter. I leave my school lap top at work now and in its place is the feather weight iPad. It is amazing how heavy those school laptops are!

I stop in a kindergarten class to work with a youngster with weak hands and poor fine motor skills. He is finishing up a center activity, a mosaic paper tearing task. I demonstrate how to tear paper with the tips of his fingers instead of a whole hand grasp. He signs his name on the back with a more confident signature. His lines are darker and straighter instead of light and wavy. It must be the prior finger activity preparing his muscles and joints. Next, we use pop-toobs as a two-handed task to build arm strength. They make a very satisfying sound. After stretching them out, I have him put one end to his ear as he repeats positive affirmations ("I am amazing") in the other end.

We open the iPad and use Doodle Buddy to practice drawing a person. We sing the Mat Man song to help guide his drawing of body parts. By holding down the home button and on/off switch at the same time, we take a photo of his drawing. He goes to the photo app and compares the drawing with one he drew several weeks ago.











Finally, we open the Dexteria app to the Tap IT activity, a finger dexterity and isolation task. He is learning to isolate individual finger movements, something needed in order to manipulate a pencil to form letters, type on a keyboard or play a musical instrument. Hmm...he has improved over the past month when all his fingers moved at once.

I consult on a youngster in second grade with challenges in attention, sensory regulation and motor output. As I walk into his classroom, he is finishing up a story on crocodiles. I check up on the writing strategies we developed for him. After just 5 minutes of working with him, it is snack time (you don't own the schedule when you are a school based therapist!). The student is ready to be done with writing, and is hungry to boot! As he eats his snack, we keep the focus on crocodiles. His most recent page in his story is on crocodiles and predators, so we look up more information by googling this using Safari. Because the iPad is "instant on", we don't miss a beat. If I was waiting for a laptop to open up, I might have lost his interest. We discover an interesting article on Animal Planet. I read the information to him, but he could have listened to it using VoiceOver (an accessibility feature built right into the iPad). Next, I refine the search to images. This brings up many intriguing photos of crocodiles and their predators. The student remains engaged, building his knowledge base. He scrolls through the images, enlarging them with a two finger touch and goes to the link to get more information. After snack, he hasn't "checked out". He uses his writing checklist to make corrections in his story for capitalization, punctuation and spelling. He then transitions to the next activity, energized from this experience. The iPad supports the third principle of UDL, for sure!

After lunch, I have an IEP meeting. Several years back I took notes by hand. I was a terrible filer and I struggled with an ever-growing pile of paper on my desk. Last year I moved to typing notes on a laptop. I never liked the separation a laptop created on a table. Often, I would keep the laptop on my lap to avoid this.

Today, I open Notes and start a new page for this meeting. The iPad can sit flat or with a slight incline. It does not create a barrier between you and others at the table. It is like writing on a piece of paper. We consider different writing support programs for this student. One is Clicker 5. As the special educator explains the program to the regular ed teacher, I bring up the website and show an image of the tool. As the meeting adjourns, I put my iPad to sleep. This is one note I will not misplace on my desk.

At the end of the day, I open the First Class app and send a few follow-up emails.



My day with an ipad...doing things differently. I wouldn't have it any other way.

Wednesday, May 18, 2011

Conversation Builder





App Name/Publisher: ConversationBuilder/Mobile Education Tools

Description/Therapy Use:

Many students require training in “scripting” and sustaining conversational turns in logical and topical ways, but there are not a lot of engaging materials to facilitate these goals. Conversation Builder provides picture stimuli and auditory prompts that allow students to practice initiating and continuing conversations of varying lengths (4-8 turns). Additionally, students can engage in both multiple-choice and open-ended modes and “pass the iPad” to a peer to continue the activity in a group setting. Both modes allow students to record and play back the entire conversation to assist in internalizing the script. Conversation Builder seems to really fill a gap in terms of engaging and useful materials for this intervention area. It also provides a data source to measure progress on “# of turns in conversation type of IEP goals” and makes great use of the iPad interface (in terms of high-quality visuals, use of audio).

App Benefits/Likes: “Group” (open-ended) mode of play will allow clinicians to shape and reinforce a variety of appropriate scripts. Visual supports and recording features facilitate student’s engagement with the app, participation and learning.

Cautions: Initial conversation modules are not those that students would most encounter in the school setting and could be more functional. 1-1 Mode (multiple choice) “correct” responses are a bit arbitrary (fine subtleties between response choices) and often more than one could be appropriate for the situation.

App Summary

Skill(s) Targeted
Expressive & Receptive Language
Social Skills/Pragmatics

Age/Grade Levels Targeted
Kindergarten
Early Elementary (Grades 1 – 3)
Upper Elementary (Grades 3- 6)
Middle School/Junior High (Grades 7-9)

How to Activate
Isolated finger point
Touch and release

Type of Device
iPad only

Cost
$5.99 for base app (additional conversational modules are available for purchase in-app)

Would you recommend this app?
Yes

Hyperlink
http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/conversationbuilder/id413939366?mt=8

Reviewed by
Sean Sweeney M.S., M.Ed., CCC-SLP, Jeremy Legaspi CCC-SLP and Renena Joy, M.Sc., S-LP(C)

Review Date
May 15th, 2011

Disclosure: Reviewers received a promo code for this app.


Monday, May 16, 2011

Doodle Buddy

This post also appears in modified form on SpeechTechie.

App Name/Publisher: Doodle Buddy/Pinger, Inc

Description: I am really finding a lot of uses for Doodle Buddy, an always-FREE app for iPhone/iPod/iPad.  Doodle Buddy is a simple sketchpad app in which you can draw or paint in a variety of colors, then shake the device to erase the drawing area.  Doodle Buddy has a set of free "stamps" (and you can also add/use text boxes) and more can be purchased in-app if you'd like.  Pictures can be easily saved and emailed from the app. The iPad version makes good use of the full touch screen, and the iPhone version works nicely too!

Therapy Use:
  • Doodle Buddy could be helpful in any activity in which you need a quick visual: schedules, comic strip conversations, illustrating vocabulary, etc, and also is just a general creative tool to build language through sketching and stamps.
  • Games in which sketches are made (such as Pictionary) are made more motivating and fun with the use of Doodle Buddy.
  • I used Doodle Buddy as a tool to incorporate The Incredible Five Point Scale in a teen group that gets a little boisterous.  After creating a 5-point scale together to describe the levels of activity within a group, I simply sketched the color-coded numbers 1-5 and saved them as separate pictures on my phone.  This way I have a quickly accessible visual anytime I want to reinforce appropriate interaction and loudness levels or let them know when they need to tone it down.

The Chaos Scale!
A Sketch from Doodle Buddy can be used to give a group feedback.

App Benefits/Likes: Super-simple way to make a quick sketch to support any kind of tx, pictures are easily shared/emailed.

Cautions: Easier to use on iPad (more screen to work with), some "stamps" not free.

App Summary

Skill(s) Targeted
AAC
Aphasia
Articulation & Phonology
Fluency
Expressive & Receptive Language
Literacy
Social Skills/Pragmatics
S-LP Tools/Organization
Voice

Age/Grade Levels Targeted
Toddler
Preschool
Kindergarten
Early Elementary (Grades 1 – 3)
Upper Elementary (Grades 3- 6)
Middle School/Junior High (Grades 7-9)
High School (Grades 10 – 12)
Adult

How to Activate
Hold and drag

Type of Device
iPhone, iPod Touch, iPad
Universal

Would you recommend this app?
Yes

Hyperlink

Reviewed by
Sean Sweeney

Review Date
May 17, 2011

Friday, May 13, 2011

Popplet

App Name/Publisher: Popplet/Notion

Description: Popplet is officially a "Productivity" app that can be used for mind-mapping and collaboration.  Applications and websites of this type (and Popplet has an online version, see review today at SpeechTechie) have much to offer SLPs, because they can be used to create interactive graphic organizers.  Popplet in particular has a clean, cool, simple-to-use interface in this regard.  Popplets created with the iPad app can be exported to email or jpeg format, or, if created while logged in to a Popplet account, synced to the web for continued work there.  The advantages of this could include students collaborating on the same graphic organizer.


Therapy Use: Popplet could be used to create graphic organizers, provide visuals for a classroom-based or other topic, and organize material according to text structures (list, sequence, compare-contrast, cause-effect), all research-based practices.  Popplet would also be a good venue to practice sentence combining and complex sentence creation with connecting of individual Popples.  Articulation or Fluency targets could be reviewed in a Popplet.

Here's a Popplet I made with a client who was studying weather in his classroom

App Benefits/Likes: Clean, simple interface, appropriate cost, ease of including images, exportable formats, potential for collaboration between students.

Cautions: Online free account limits you to 5 Popplets (though full iPad version allows unlimited amount).

App Summary

Skill(s) Targeted
Aphasia
Articulation & Phonology
Fluency
Expressive & Receptive Language
Literacy
Social Skills/Pragmatics
S-LP Tools/Organization

Age/Grade Levels Targeted
Upper Elementary (Grades 3- 6)
Middle School/Junior High (Grades 7-9)
High School (Grades 10 – 12)
Adult

How to Activate
Touch and release
Hold and drag
Type

Type of Device
iPad only

Cost
$4.99 for full version with unlimited use (I incorrectly said $8 in video, it has come down in price since I bought it), Free for Lite version (limited to one Popplet)

Would you recommend this app?
Yes

Hyperlink
http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/popplet/id374151636?mt=8

Reviewed by
Sean J. Sweeney, CCC-SLP

Review Date
May 6, 2011

Wednesday, May 11, 2011

Pocket SLP Articulation


App Name/Publisher: Pocket SLP Articulation by Synapse Apps, LLC

Description: Pocket SLP Articulation puts in one’s hands over 2,100 flashcards for use during articulation therapy. These flashcards were specifically picked to target select phonemes and by the phonemes’ position of occurrence. Offhand it may appear to be a simple flashcard app that presents pictures and words. The app however boasts of speech and articulation therapy-friendly tools such as options to select which phonemes to target (making the app select the pictures containing the specified phonemes), option to have the app present pictures whose target phonemes occur in the initial, medial and final positions, and using a simple scoring system, present a Phoneme Summary screen that outlines each client’s correct, incorrect, and approximated responses in percentages.

Therapy Use: Pocket SLP Articulation can be used mainly for articulation therapy, specifically on a word level and allows one to target blends as well. The app can also be used to target word retrieval, but this would require covering each picture’s word label.

App Benefits/Likes:
  • has over 2,100 flashcards (minus the physical weight!)
  • decks are customizable: one can select which phonemes to target and their positions of occurrence
  • the app lets one mark correct and incorrect productions
  • one tap and the screen shows illustrations on how the active target phoneme is produced
  • the Phoneme Summary screen makes this app a sure winner: there are even options to email, save, or review previous scores

Cautions: several pictures may appear too small especially on iPhones and iPod Touches. These same pictures may be more recognizable however on iPads
there is a bit of a lag after starting the app up (at least on an iPhone 3GS), and some delay in responsivity to swipes (to turn the page). This may prove to be otherwise in 4th generation iDevices

App Summary: Having an extremely useful and articulation-specific app such as this boosts the functionality of any iDevice at work. When one realizes that this app can be used over and over again and get each client’s performance ‘scores’ after each use, suddenly $29.99 sounds like a bargain. It is a bargain and a worthwhile investment.

Skill(s) Targeted
Articulation & Phonology
Age/Grade Levels Targeted
Kindergarten
Early Elementary (Grades 1 – 3)
Upper Elementary (Grades 3- 6)
Middle School/Junior High (Grades 7-9)
High School (Grades 10 – 12)
Adult

How to Activate
Isolated finger point
Swipe

Type of Device
iPhone, iPod Touch, iPad

Cost
$ 29.99

Would you recommend this app?
Yes

Hyperlink
http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/pocket-slp-articulation/id359179209?mt=8#

Reviewed by
iSPeak App by Carla Cuadro

Review Date
29 April 2011

Monday, May 9, 2011

Story Patch


App Name/Publisher: Story Patch/Haywoodsoft, LLC

Description: This app allows the user to create, edit, share and read an original story. Based on the user’s age, Story Patch allows for complete original text or a story created based upon answers to questions the user has answered. The user can choose from (800 illustrations) preloaded characters, animals/objects, scenery and/or their own photos. It even allows you to “start from scratch” to build a character or use one from the genres of characters (superheroes, sports players, people at work etc..). Building a character is truly amazing as you can not only select hair and skin color but also facial expression and what the body is doing (running etc).

Therapy Use: This app has so many therapeutic uses that it will be hard to list them all! It’s been a favorite of those with Autism as it is highly interactive and allows them to create a story through the use of the questions and then hear it read back to them using their very own name. Creating a character leads to some great discussions about facial expressions and emotions. The obvious uses of this app would be for receptive and expressive language however, it could also be used for articulation practice at the word (make an entire page of objects with speech sound), sentence (reading the story) and conversation (retelling the story in own words) levels. The possibilities are endless. An additional feature is that the story can then be emailed to the parent for continued practice or enjoyment.

Benefits/Likes: Ease of use, endless creations, many therapeutic uses, holds attention.

Cautions: At first glance, appears difficult to use.

App Summary

Skill(s) Targeted
Articulation & Phonology
Expressive & Receptive Language
Literacy
Social Skills/Pragmatics (emotions/facial expression)
Age/Grade Levels Targeted
Preschool
Kindergarten
Early Elementary (Grades 1 – 3)
Upper Elementary (Grades 3- 6)
Middle School/Junior High (Grades 7-9) (using own photographs)
High School (Grades 10 – 12) (using photographs)

How to Activate
Isolated finger point
Touch and release
Hold and drag

Type of Device
iPad only

Cost
$.99(sale price until temperature reaches 99 in creator’s hometown in Arizona!) regularly $4.99

Would you recommend this app?
Yes

Hyperlink
http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/story-patch/id388613157?mt=8

Reviewed by
Jennifer Hatfield, M.H.S, CCC/SLP

Review Date
April 29, 2011

Friday, May 6, 2011

ICOON: Global Picture Dictionary

App Name/Publisher: ICOON: Global Picture Dictionary by Amberpress

Description: ICOON: Global Picture Dictionary is an app for picture communication. Originally intended for easing communication abroad, this can be easily adapted to help those with disabilities in their day to day lives. The line drawings and pictures show 500 everyday objects and symbols broken down into 12 categories. This app has pictures only, no sound or words. This app is a communication aid for people with aphasia, ALS, traumatic brain injury, autism, cerebral pasly.

Therapy Use: For expressive (non-verbal) output; as a therapy activity for receptive language and word finding. (ie. "point to the apple" or "what is this called?")

App Benefits/Likes:
Inexpensive at $0.99
Can be used with ESL patients
Clean, simple layout
Over 500 pictures and 12 categories
Can be used in both therapy and as communication tool in the community

Cautions: For children, adults; no words or voice output

App Summary

Skill(s) Targeted
AAC
Aphasia
Expressive Language
Receptive Language
Social Skills/Pragmatics

Age/Grade Levels Targeted
Upper Elementary (Grades 3- 6)
Middle School/Junior High (Grades 7-9)
High School (Grades 10 – 12)
Adult

How to Activate
Isolated finger point
Touch and release

Type of Device
iOS Device

Cost
$0.99

Would you recommend this app?
Yes

Hyperlink
http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/icoon-global-picture-dictionary/id294236771?mt=8

Reviewed by
Jena H. Casbon, MS, CCC-SLP
www.IndependentClinician.com

Review Date
April 27, 2011

Wednesday, May 4, 2011

Evernote

App Name/Publisher: Evernote/Evernote


Description: As someone who is constantly trying to stay organized in a world that seems increasingly unorganized, Evernote has been my answer. As a clinician who is always inspired by various materials in the “real world,” I have struggled with how to find ideas, save ideas, and oh yeah…remember them later. I’m sure you’re constantly wondering…What was that website I read about literacy? Or, What was the name of that book that had that great “kickoff”? Who was I supposed to call between 12 and 1 (while I’m inhaling my lunch and planning treatment for the rest of the afternoon)? Evernote is your answer. The best part is that it’s available across devices. I use it on my Android phone, my iPad, and my laptop. I “sync” anything I do, and it’s available at my fingertips.

Here are the main ways that I use Evernote as an SLP:
1. To do lists:


I can easily create to do lists on my laptop or even on my phone, anytime.

2. Saving websites for treatment or to read later when I have some downtime:


Above is a website I saved that Sean had referenced a few weeks ago on his site that I thought would be great for a couple students on my caseload, as well as for a presentation I was doing. Evernote has a webclipping function on its desktop version (you can do this on the iPad as well in a slightly different way) that allows me to clip the entire site, or just parts of it that I highlight to save. The tag function allows me to enter text to help me find it later. I added “auditory comprehension” and “tobin presentation” as the tags. Additionally, I placed it in a specific notebook “CTA” my “work” label to differentiate it from my personal notebook where I put recipes, books I want to read, quotes, memories, restaurants to try, etc. Evernote also allows the share function. I can email this note (or even entire notebooks) to others, as well as even make it public. I could email this note to a fellow SLP or teacher who I think may benefit from this website, or even to a parent for a home programming suggestion. I use this webclipping function constantly to save articles from Sean’s site, ASHA, and other sites I visit regularly, and then read them during some downtime. I even will tag it- “downtime” again just to help me find it later.

3. Organizing inspiration for treatment:


Above on the left, after observing another clinician in a treatment session working on description, I jotted down a couple activities I thought would be a good idea to try with one of my students. I took a quick picture with my phone, and “shared” the picture to Evernote (an option with the app on my phone). Evernote can search handwritten text too. Later if I type in “description” or even “book” in my search, this note will come up, along with anything else that has these words anywhere in the text. I also can email this to my graduate student to give her some ideas for planning treatment with this child.

Above to the right is a book that was recommended to me that a friend was reading. I took a quick shot of this on my phone, and sent to my Evernote account. Again, Evernote can search the text in the picture, so I can easily find this later. I could search by “book” (I wrote book in the text of note), “play” or even the author. Anything in the text would allow me to find this later.

Therapy Use: I think Evernote could be a great innovative tool for older students. My current caseload doesn’t have appropriate students, however, www.evernote.com in addition to YouTube has testimonial after testimonial of how Evernote has been helpful in the classroom. Teachers are showing students how to use to write research papers, take notes, brainstorm, etc. Students with executive functioning difficulties would clearly benefit from this multimodal organization system. Its flexibility across devices would certainly be functional for our students on the go. We all know the power of technology with these students. Evernote would be an easy “sell.”

Other ideas:
• Taking pictures, and/or recording to save student work to “mark” progress, share with their families, and/or their educational team
• Save quotes from students- either through typing or even audio recordings. We all know kids say the darndest things…. Evernote can serve as a place for your therapy “memories.”
• Collaborate with other professionals on a project through the “share” function
• Take notes during meetings, phone calls, etc.
• Evernote allows you to “attach” pictures, and PDFs as well allowing access to these documents everywhere you are if necessary

Cautions: It functions differently on the iPad and phone obviously, so there is some getting used to for the differences. I have found YouTube videos to be really helpful in understanding. I recommend re-organizing and labeling notes on the desktop/laptop for ease. Overall a minor challenge for the overall benefits of this software.

I’ve only skimmed the surface with the capabilities of Evernote. Please visit their website for step by step instructions. I promise you’ll be inspired to get organized and test this out.

App Summary

Skill(s) Targeted
Aphasia
TBI
Expressive & Receptive Language
Literacy

Age/Grade Levels Targeted
Middle School/Junior High (Grades 7-9)
High School (Grades 10 – 12)
Adult

How to Activate
Swipe
Touch and release
Hold and drag

Type of Device
Universal


Cost
FREE


Would you recommend this app?
Yes

Hyperlink
Evernote Web
iOS App

Reviewed by
Meghan Gallahan Graham

Review Date
May 11. 2011

Monday, May 2, 2011

More Buffet!


App Name/Publisher: More Buffet!/Maverick Software

Description: Maverick continues their series of interactive plate-building apps with an international twist in More Buffet (Maverick previously released fun food preparation apps such as More Grillin!). This app allows you to choose a country and fill a plate with culturally specific foods. Additional interactive aspects involve “rolling” sushi, constructing burgers and creating a pasta dish. The app initially let us experience American, Mexican, German, English, Italian, Chinese and Japanese cuisine, and a recent update added Indian and Australian food. When your plate is complete, you can “eat” it by tapping it away or email your dish to a friend or parent!



Therapy Use: More Buffet! is a great context for building descriptive, categorical, spatial and sequential language. Additionally, it aligns with school-based curriculum around continents and countries. More Buffet! is a good opportunity to play “waiter and diner” within group settings, with one student “ordering” a plate from another, thus working on specific language and listening skills.

App Benefits/Likes: Visual and hugely fun, with the promise of growth as additional countries are added.

Cautions: Slightly less interactive than previous apps in the series such as More Grillin! (which allows you to actually “cook” and flip the food on the grill).

App Summary

Skill(s) Targeted
Aphasia
Articulation & Phonology
Expressive & Receptive Language
Literacy
Social Skills/Pragmatics

Age/Grade Levels Targeted
Kindergarten
Early Elementary (Grades 1 – 3)
Upper Elementary (Grades 3- 6)
Middle School/Junior High (Grades 7-9)
High School (Grades 10 – 12)
Adult

How to Activate
Hold and drag

Type of Device
iPhone, iPod Touch, iPad

Cost
$.99 US (Currently)

Would you recommend this app?
Yes

Hyperlink
http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/more-buffet/id417379307?mt=8#

Reviewed by
Sean J. Sweeney

Review Date
April 18, 2011